the ɹǝɥʇo side

The neurotic ramblings of a college fangirl. Multifandom. Minimally political. Openly Catholic.

August 29, 2014 12:43 pm 12:43 pm

last-cinderella:

I do like him. I love him.
He’s not proud. I was wrong, I was entirely wrong about him.
He and I are… He and I are so similar.
We’re both so stubborn.

(via fuckyeahdarcyandelizabeth)

12:11 pm 12:10 pm
fishingboatproceeds:

Since the TFIOS movie became available On Demand and for digital download and people can now pause and zoom in and stuff, many people have asked who wrote the pages of An Imperial Affliction that appear in the movie.
I did. Executive producer Isaac Klausner asked me to write four pages (the two you see here and the final two pages of the book) for the movie edition of An Imperial Affliction, so I did. In this passage, Anna is recalling intense pain breaking through her high doses of narcotic pain medication. 
The book that Hazel reads in the movie is just the four pages I wrote printed over and over again hundreds of times. I have a copy of it in my house; it’s my only souvenir from the movie set.

fishingboatproceeds:

Since the TFIOS movie became available On Demand and for digital download and people can now pause and zoom in and stuff, many people have asked who wrote the pages of An Imperial Affliction that appear in the movie.

I did. Executive producer Isaac Klausner asked me to write four pages (the two you see here and the final two pages of the book) for the movie edition of An Imperial Affliction, so I did. In this passage, Anna is recalling intense pain breaking through her high doses of narcotic pain medication. 

The book that Hazel reads in the movie is just the four pages I wrote printed over and over again hundreds of times. I have a copy of it in my house; it’s my only souvenir from the movie set.

(via bdnocampo)

12:09 pm

theconsultingshieldmaiden:

swagbat:

Khal Drogo: “I nominate Viserys for the GOLDbucket challenge!!”

image

(via wantingmemories)

12:07 pm

bubonickitten:

…did i just witness a three-way crossover

yes

yes i did

(Source: lebaratheon, via bdnocampo)

12:07 pm
  • Elementary School: Here's a basic understanding of history and how the world works.
  • High School: Actually, that's not quite right. Everything is actually a whole lot more complicated than that.
  • College: EVERYTHING YOU KNOW IS WRRROOONNNNGGGG
  • History Channel: Aliens.
12:07 pm

anfonymackie:

do vampires just use their teeth to make a puncture wound and then suck, or are their fangs like a straw

i havent slept in three days

(via wantingmemories)

11:48 am 11:48 am

firelorcl:

hairstyles change your entire appearance don’t even try to tell me they don’t

(via manda)

11:45 am
"I get way too sensitive when I get attached to someone. I can detect the slightest change in the tone of their voice, and suddenly I’m spending all day trying to figure out what I did wrong."

Humans of New York - Amman, Jordan (via 5000letters)

(via bdnocampo)

11:27 am 11:25 am
the-star-card:

lierdumoa:

benwinstagram:

tru

So I watched this music video, and this is in fact completely untrue. There are many scenes in which black/brown girls are casted.
One could conceivably argue that  any white star who features twerking in a music video is automatically being exploitative.
However, that was not my perception of this video in particular. It actually appeared to me the director took pains to portray a variety of dance styles (ballet, interpretive dance, rhythmic gymnastics, break dancing, twerking, cheerleading, etc.) all as equally valid art forms. Every performing group in the video includes a variety of ethnicities. I think I did actually see a black/brown dancer in the ballet troupe, though it’s difficult to tell. Look in the rear left of this gif:

We don’t know if they cast individual dancers or hired a dance troupe, so if black women are underrepresented that might say more about the dance troupe’s selection practices than the video director’s casting practices.
All the styles of dance, ballet or otherwise are presented in the same fashion — talented professionals being brilliant + Taylor Swift being endearingly incompetent. The black women in the video aren’t portrayed as Taylor’s dancing accessories, but rather as experts in their style:







Moreover, at the end of the video there’s a sequence showing all the different professionals being silly and dancing in a non-choreographed manner, thereby humanizing them, showing they exist outside of their role as dancers in Taylor’s video:


I think if we interpret the twerking scenes in this video as demeaning, that says more about our cultural perception of black women than it does about this particular video’s specific portrayal of black women. 

Wow. I’m not really a Taylor fan, but I’m glad this was pointed out.

the-star-card:

lierdumoa:

benwinstagram:

tru

So I watched this music video, and this is in fact completely untrue. There are many scenes in which black/brown girls are casted.

One could conceivably argue that  any white star who features twerking in a music video is automatically being exploitative.

However, that was not my perception of this video in particular. It actually appeared to me the director took pains to portray a variety of dance styles (ballet, interpretive dance, rhythmic gymnastics, break dancing, twerking, cheerleading, etc.) all as equally valid art forms. Every performing group in the video includes a variety of ethnicities. I think I did actually see a black/brown dancer in the ballet troupe, though it’s difficult to tell. Look in the rear left of this gif:

We don’t know if they cast individual dancers or hired a dance troupe, so if black women are underrepresented that might say more about the dance troupe’s selection practices than the video director’s casting practices.

All the styles of dance, ballet or otherwise are presented in the same fashion — talented professionals being brilliant + Taylor Swift being endearingly incompetent. The black women in the video aren’t portrayed as Taylor’s dancing accessories, but rather as experts in their style:

Moreover, at the end of the video there’s a sequence showing all the different professionals being silly and dancing in a non-choreographed manner, thereby humanizing them, showing they exist outside of their role as dancers in Taylor’s video:

I think if we interpret the twerking scenes in this video as demeaning, that says more about our cultural perception of black women than it does about this particular video’s specific portrayal of black women. 

Wow. I’m not really a Taylor fan, but I’m glad this was pointed out.

(via delphiniumsmiles)